Courses in English

Universidad del Desarrollo offers each semester different courses taught completely in English. These courses are intended for international students and also for UDD students.

Universidad del Desarrollo offers each semester different courses taught completely in English. These courses are intended for international students and also for UDD students.

For the first semester 2012 (March-July), we are offering the following courses taught completely in English:

International Organizations

General Description

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of international organizations. The multi-disciplinary nature of the course provides students from various fields of study to gain the contextual knowledge and tools necessary to work in the increasingly interconnected fields of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations, and companies that work with these institutions. Giving attention to the global context in which international institutions function, attention will be given to the political, social, economic and legal environment within which multilateral organizations operate. Students will also gain insight into the moral, ethical and social realities facing international managers, who must understand the legal environment, encourage ethical behavior, and weigh difficult trade-offs in the real world. After a number of classes on theory and cross-cutting institutional issues, the bulk of the course is devoted to the substantive work and study of multilateral institutions including the United Nations, international financial institutions, and organizations related to peace and security, human rights, and sustainable development. The course structure will consist of lectures and guided discussion, interactive group activities and guest lectures from leading experts currently working for world-renowned international organizations.

This course has 10 UDD credits and 85 academic hours of classes per semester.

Art and Chilean Culture

General Description

This course has the intention to bring students near to the study and comprehension of the cultural development of Chile as a nation and its resulting identity, understanding that it becomes such as a product of a complex relations network between social, political, cultural and economic processes, both national and international. It also focuses on how different cultural expressions convey aspects of the same culture.

In order to achieve this goal, the course is structured to first attain a basic theoretical and historical framework, then briefly revising Chilean cultural evolution during the 19th and 20th centuries to finally focus on the analysis of different cultural expressions as well as comparative analysis to our Latin American and European counterparts, while also opening a debate about current Chilean culture and identity, including the situation about indigenous peoples.

As ambitious as the task of defining a “Chilean culture and identity” is, this course has no intentions to incur in a profound analysis, but it does has as goal to give out a general outline and to facilitate the tools to build a personal well-documented opinion on the subject matter, as well for students to come away with a sense of what is particular or not to us as Chileans and where these concepts originate.

This course has 10 UDD credits and 85 academic hours of classes per semester.

Globalization and Its Impact

General Description

This course is designed to help prepare students for thinking globally. The aim of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to discuss diverse theories and practices of globalization. The course considers the theoretical and practical sources that underpin various contemporary debates on globalization, for example, free trade versus fair trade, democracy versus capitalism, technological revolution versus ecological risk, the state versus civil society and national liberation versus cosmopolitanism.

Not only will this course demonstrate the global dimensions of several crucial contemporary issues, including the problem of global conflict, the global environment, and health and population concerns, it also will underline the necessity of an interdisciplinary approach to understanding these issues. Scientific questions have political, social, economic, and ethical dimensions. Similarly, economic matters are inextricably linked with their cultural, psychological, political, technological, geopolitical, and moral aspects. The concerns of what can be called the global challenge demonstrate the relational thinking students will be called upon to exercise in other academic contexts, and throughout the rest of their personal and professional lives.
Ultimately the course will facilitate students to develop their own vision of globalization.

This course has 10 UDD credits and 85 academic hours of classes per semester.

Introduction to Latin American Art

General Description

This course will examine Latin American Art in all its visual manifestations. We will begin with a brief introduction to Mesa-Americana and Andean Art and Architecture, following with Colonial Art, decorative arts and Architecture to then understand the process of Internationalization that Latin American art and architecture goes through as we become independent nations and bring in European influences. The second half of the semester will focus on the 20th Century in Latin American arts, including the major International movements, such as cubism, geometric abstraction, surrealism, abstract expressionism, among others and important and Latin American based movements such as muralism, constructivism (with a Latin American focus), and poster art.  The main idea of this course is for you to become familiar with artistic movements within Latin America.

This course has 10 UDD credits and 85 academic hours of classes per semester.